Supplemental Light & Bermudagrass: An On Field Trial Upcoming

 

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Reflecting back over our sharing during the last year, we have realized that a pair of posts referencing two different topics at two different times inadvertently are extremely related. Their relation has lead to a trial about to begin utilizing supplemental grow lights to sustain bermudagrass growth through the fall.

“Transition Zone Bermudagrass Out of Gas This Spring” looked into/ shared lessons we were learning during spring and early summer bermudgrass struggles following a mild winter. Bermudagrass didn’t go into full dormancy with the mild temperatures. But instead of mild being a positive, lack of dormancy was a negative because the green and growing bermudgrass didn’t have the required light level for efficient photosynthesis. Carbohydrate/ energy reserves in the bermudagrass plants were burned up and the bermuda could not give a spring surge for growth and recovery.

In the “Let There Be Light Follow Up”, we took a look at bermudagrass light requirement and discussed the decrease of natural light from the sun in the fall season. By October, the sun does not produce enough light to sustain efficient bermudagrass photosynthesis and the grass slows down. Temperature change then follows to fully induce dormancy. Supplemental light could have a positive impact on bermudagrass growth then to sustain growth.

These two pieces are very much related, even though we were looking at different things at different times.  And there was a strong hypothesis coming from both:  Supplemental grow lighting will sustain bermudagrass growth late into the season.

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Supplemental Light On Celebration Bermuda Sod Just Installed

To test the hypothesis developed from these pieces, a trial utilizing supplemental grow lighting will start in just a few weeks at Duke University. Duke, located in the transition zone in Durham, NC and growing Latitude 36 bermudagrass, is the perfect location for such a trial. Their forward thinking field management team, lead by Scott Thompson and Ian Christie, have already made the move away from ryegrass overseeding and focus all their skill on sustaining bermdagrass growth through football season. Thus such a trial is a natural progression. This trial will track total light levels for the field on the top of the stadium, light levels under the lights, soil temperature, growth, and recovery from game traffic both with and without light.   Also documented throughout will be the ability to hold sheer strength and durability on the surface.

We took at look at the Par natural light from the sun in “Out of Gas”. Here is the chart:

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Par Light Average In Mol/day In Raleigh-Durham, NC (www.SGLConcept.com)

 

The results of this trial should be clear, much like the original USA supplemental light trial carried out in Green Bay using light to sustain cool season grass growth into December. To back up our current hypothesis with bermudagrass, we have dug into the research to find previous trials involving bermudagrass growth and supplemental light. Interestingly enough, the single research trial we found was found was directly examining the relationship of light and temperature in bermudagrass growth.

Effects of temperature and photoperiod on postponing bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon [L.] Pers.) turf dormancy. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22465814. The research summary includes a basic and simple statement:

“Practically, the problem of bermudagrass turf’s dormancy could be solved via increasing the photoperiod in months with short day lengths. This treatment would be efficient and useful for turfgrass managers to apply in landscapes and stadiums.”  

The research was performed in growth chambers and was carried out over 2 years. It explored a range of temperature and light amounts. The conclusions of the study support the previous theme that has developed that supplemental light will delay bermudagrass dormancy even in colder temperatures. Ultimately, the conclusions of the study lay the ground work for confidence that the Duke trial will succeed in sustaining bermudagrass growth through the end of the season. In the bigger picture, the results of sustained growth could yield in reducing or eliminating ryegrass overseeding on many American football fields. Or even more helpful for field conditions and field safety, could reduce and/or eliminate sod repairs during late season play on grass fields.

The study also reinforces that the new installation of lights at M&T Bank Stadium in Baltimore will yield great success in sustaining bermudagrass growth late into the NFL season. Even with Baltimore being further north and having a much more harsh winter climate than Duke, the results should be dramatic because of the under soil heating system that Sports Field Managers Don Follett and Sean Kauffman are able to utilize. Maintaining a desired soil temperature in combination with supplemental light through the fall will maximize growth and recovery to the fullest extent.

From hypothesis to research and now into actual practice. The potential for supplemental light to sustain bermudagrass growth certain seems to be the future approaching the present quickly.  With data and results continue to support the need for supplemental lighting, the next step is accept the possibilities and expand its use on natural grass surfaces.  This will pair with evolving technology in grass genetics and plant feeding to be able to sustain increased use  on natural grass with reduced repairs.  The future is BRIGHT!

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M&T Bank Stadium: Special Thanks to Don Follett and Sean Kauffman

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Transition Zone Bermudagrass: “Out of Gas” This Spring??

Mother Nature has reminded us this spring that the seasonal “average” weather isn’t always what she decides to provide us. For most of the spring, especially through the Midwest and Mid-Atlantic regions, the up and down temperatures have stressed even cool season turfgrass. After a warmer winter period and above normal temperatures in March that encouraged spring green… prolonged periods of overcast, cold and damp followed. Cool season is stressed, but bermudagrass is REALLY confused. Bermuda in many situations is acting like it just “out of gas” to be able to regenerate or transition out from ryegrass overseeding.

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Green Bermudagrass Under Grow Covers in Feb, In Washington, DC

But we are seeing some very different bermudagrass results with regeneration and/or transition. Some bermudagrass fields are fighting back strong now that we are into May, yet some continue to face challenges. But why? Temperatures across through the Midwest and Mid-Atlantic came up early to support bermudagrass to pull out of dormancy early. Shouldn’t it be growing actively by now, even with the cool and overcast?

Literally, it really is just “Out of Gas”!!!

The lack of full dormancy and early spring green up, things we thought were good, are actually what is leading to the bermudagrass being “out of gas”. It can even be worse on bermudagrass that was kept under grow covers most of the winter. The covers provided temperatures for the bermuda to continue to grow. But we now are understanding that temperature alone is not enough. The importance of light for photosynthesis in bermudagrass has been overlooked. The short days w/ a low sun angle through the fall, winter and spring have a bigger impact on bermudagrass growth than we have ever realized.

Light Requirement For Bermudagrass: Bermudagrass requires more than for cool season. On average, bermudagrass varieties requires around 35 mol/ day of light for photosynthesis to produce the required energy for normal plant processes. In Raleigh-Durham, North Carloina in full sun (no winter damaged tissue or ryegrass overseeding producing shade), the sun provides (See chart below for entire year):

Fall:       Sept 10 to Oct 8 average: 39.5 mols/ day
               Oct 8 to Nov. 5 average: 28.1 mols/ day
               Nov 5 to Dec 3 average: 19.9 mols/ day
Winter: Dec 3 to Dec 31 average: 19.3 mols/ day
               Jan 1 to Jan 29 average: 19.3 mols/ day
               Jan 29 to Feb 26 average: 26.8 mols/ day
              Feb 26 to March 26 average: 33.4 mols/ day 
Spring: March 26 to April 23 average : 46.3 mols/ day   (FINALLY above 35 Mol/day!)
              April 23 to May 21 average: 48.2 mols/day

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Par Light Average In Mol/day In Raleigh-Durham, NC (www.SGLConcept.com)

From mid October until the first of April, even in full sun, photosynthesis can not produce enough energy to support regular bermudagrass plant growth. Thats over 5 MONTHS! For bermudagrass further north in somewhere like Kansas City, the light required for healthy growth would lack for nearly 6 months. Newer varieties of bermudagrass like Latitude36 and Celebration require less light than the 35 mols/ day, so we see them sustain growth later in the fall and earlier in the spring. But overall, the light for photosynthesis just isn’t there.

So what? Why does this matter to bermudagrass?  When Mother Nature provides warmer temperatures, or when we manipulate the growing environment with grow tarps, bermudagrass grass sustains green and produces growth. But because photosynthesis isn’t producing energy to keep up with that growth, late season or early spring growth, the energy reserves of the bermudagrass are burned up and the plant goes into stress and starvation mode. Some fields we have this spring have actually went dormant when they were green in January and February. Or fields that were growing in March have slowed now even into May because of the continual overcast, cloudy and wet conditions.

Now that we understand the cause, for the short term, how do we find a solution? Follow we want to share what seems to be some of the pillars of the strong bermudagrass regeneration and transition:

Get light to the bermudagrass plants: We have established the problem of the lack of light and the need for energy production. Step 1… get light to the plants! This means:

a. Lower mowing height and increasing mowing frequency. Especially on a bermudagrass field that is overseeded. In non-overseeded, mowing low (down to 1/2” if possible) will help clean out all the dead or winter damaged tissue and promote green bermudagrass to push up through.

b. Clean out/ Open up the canopy to get sun down through. Something as simple as brushing or dragging with a steel drag can open up the canopy. Verticutting, core aeration, or Universe Fraze Mowing can clean out and open up the canopy as well. Avoid topdressing with more than 1/8” of material… we want to promote light to the plants, not increase the barrier.

c. Supplement support for energy production from bio-stimulant products: Technology in plant feeding products allows us to provide the stressed bermudagrass with the amino acids and sugars that it needs to support photosynthesis for energy. A range of patented, scientifically engineered products existing to do this so all the stress isn’t on the plant and photosynthesis. Key, patented products were are recommending for stress relief and photosynthetic support include a combination from Floratine Products Group:

  • Protesyn: Formulation of amino acids, proteins, and carbohydrates. Equate Protesyn to a sports drink and/or some liquid sunshine. Helps with lack of energy and stress!
  • Knife Plus: Micronutrient product combined with a hormone loading for support of plant systems. The micronutrients cover the range for the essential building blocks for photosynthesis
  • 5.0 Cal: Blend of calcium and simple and complex carbohydrates to support the turfgrass plant during stress periods. The calcium and sugars mirror what is produced during photosynthesis.

The fields we are seeing in the strongest condition are receiving supplemental bio-stimulant applications to support energy production. Simply… The applications are supporting plant processes to keep the plant from running out of gas!!

d. Avoiding N to drive growth, Instead using hormones to push natural, healthy growth: With getting sunlight to the plants and reducing plant stress by using plant feeding technology, its time to push the bermudagrass to start to grow and recover. Go go go! But another theme of the best fields we are seeing currently are NOT turning to just nitrogen to push growth. Historically, spring time growth and bermudagrass fill in comes from simple applications of 46-0-0 and 21-0-0. But we now know that excessive nitrogen drives unhealthy growth and burns up energy reserves. Yes, we just built up our energy reserves! Lets not burn through them already. Instead, for a granular fertilizer, turn to an organic product to feed soil microbes or a Poly coated product such as Polyon to give you control of release. Then turning to a hormone package to increase cell division and drive healthy, natural growth at this point in time. Temperatures, soil and air, continue to be low. Even if you are set on using N for your re-grow, its too cold for bermudagrass to metabolize N in the Midwest and Mid-Atlantic. Hormones, in combination with the energy support we discussed previous, really is the best ticket to get strong re-generation and transition through ryegrass in this stressful time.

Recommendations on products? We recommend our clients turn again to Floratine Products Group for some of their patented bio-stimulant products:

  • High 5: Warm-season grass specific nutrient product with hormones and micronutrients
  • Per4Max: Hormone and nutrient product designed specifically to increase GA production to promote cell division for bermudagrass to spread rapidly
    – With that combination, a potassium phosphite product also is helpful to support energy production along with .05 lbs/ of true foliar N in the spray.

De-compacted the soil!! De-compacting soil is the #1 key cultural key in the successful bermudagrass regeneration and transitions observed this spring. Wet soils compact more quickly from play than dry soil. These consistent wet conditions have led to some extreme compaction conditions. Those compacted soils need opened to:
Allows air into the soil profile, promoting both soil microbes and bermudagrass roots. The soil air and microbial activity on a de-compacted soil are essential for support growth
Allows water to move down through the soil profile faster. The water moving through reduces rain cancellations. It also allows air to come back into the soil faster. Where there is water, there is no air. Once the water can move through and air is back into the soil, both soil microbes and the bermuda roots can be stronger.

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Air2G2 Decompacting Football Sidelines with NO Disruption

Ultimately, the lessons of a challenging spring here in 2016 will help us avoid the same challenges in the years ahead. Because of the mild winter through the Midwest and Mid-Atlantic, it was assumed that the spring and summer would be much easier with winter kill totally avoided. But the damage done from semi-dormant bermudagrass attempting to grow when it is typically dormant may cause just as many challenges as winter kill could. But overall, with as aggressive as bermudagrass can be, as soon as you are able to 1) get light to the plant and 2) supplement to support energy production, the plants will recover and begin to grow. Then at that point you can 3) push healthy, strong growth with hormones and utilize slow release N to support the growth process.

And remembering the key, none of it works at all on a compacted soil! Fields need to be used, we just have to respond in new and different ways to support them. Even when Mother Nature doesn’t want to cooperate.

Keep up the great work, and share your examples of success with us if you are having them! Cheers to #GrassCanTakeMore™!!!

JM


Copyright © 2016 Growing Innovations, LLC All Rights Reserved.  

THANK YOU For Interest in SGL/ Growing Innovations Annoucement

IMG_0385Stadium Grow Lighting Officially Partners with Growing Innovations

Following the announcement of the partnership with SGL, many thanks from  Growing Innovations team for the feedback and support on the announcement !  It is a popular time for SGL.  The 2016 MasterClass took place last month in Amsterdam and Rotterdam, Holland. (read more here).  And the 2016 SGL Technology Showcase is upcoming at Red Bull Arena on May 5.

Growing Innovations is excited about the timing of last week’s announcement coming from SGL with the Technology Showcase upcoming.  Pam Sherratt of Ohio State University will be sharing with the group along with special guest Mr. Karl Stanley of Wembley Stadium in London, UK.  Mr. Stanley will be sharing some extremely interesting information in reference to maintenance of one of the most used stadium fields in the world.  Very, very excited to have him coming to the USA!

If you haven’t received an invitation, let us know and we will get you one.  The  Showcase will feature SGL technology from light to climate control to their newest addition of UV light for killing turfgrass diseases.  There is no doubt any and all participants will gain perspective and knowledge.

THANK YOU again for the support as Growing Innovations continues to “grow” and expand.  Look for the introduction of our new Sports Science and Technology Director coming soon in addition to new partnerships to continue to provide new technologies and solutions to meet the demand of high use on natural grass surfaces!

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SGL MasterClass Wrap Up

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MasterClass 2016 proved to be a thought provoking and educational event. MasterClass is an invitation only, education event put on by Stadium Grow Light (SGL) specifically for their over 180 stadium customers around the globe to come together. 2016 MasterClass was entitled “Back to the Future” to celebrate the 10th anniversary of the unique event. MasterClass #1 was also held in Holland, Home of SGL.  A full detailed break down of the event can be experienced here on the live blog of MasterClass 2016, “Back to the Future”.

Day 1 of MasterClass took place at the world famous Amsterdam Arena. Day 2 featured a visit to Porta Nova, the 25 acre rose growing operation that has been in SGL inventor Nico van Vuuren’s family since the 1890’s. At Porta Nova, MasterClass participants also were exposed to ongoing research being done by the SGL agronomy team. After Porta Nova, MasterClass moved to Rotterdam, Holland’s Feyenoord Stadium for a pitch tour and to wrap up the education and sharing.

Let’s look at some of the key thoughts and points of the events education and sharing:

IMPROVEMENT: SGL is the world leader in the supplemental light technology sector, a sector that they (SGL) created. Supplemental light research and technology reached the sales market during the early 2000’s when SGL successfully completed its first trial at Sunderland’s Stadium of Light in the UK. Since they have grown to have over 180 stadiums around the world using supplemental light for natural grass growth and recovery. But even as the world leader, SGL continues to evolve and improve.

Three examples of that improvement were on display at MasterClass:

LU440: The LU440 is a new, full size light unit with aluminum construction. The aluminum reduces the overall weight of the unit dramatically. It also allows the unit to fold up much easier, which saves time on set up and break down of light rig. The LU440 overall is a dramatic improvement on an already fantastic full size light unit, the MU360. While the LU440 is still in limited supply, the MU360 is still am amazing tool for supplying supplemental light!

IQ55: The IQ55 was considered by many as the star of MasterClass 2016. The IQ55 is a full climate controlled tent unit to provide natural grass field managers with a tool to control all components of plant growth. Temperature, humidity, moisture, CO2, O2, light… any and all factors leading to plant growth, health, and recovery… can be controlled with an automated system. And all of it mounted on a standard, MU50 type light rig frame for simple movement. As the playing season now is nearly year round, the IQ55 provides a tool that can support growth and recovery at any time.

Modeling Improvements/ Additional of Disease Pressure: SGL provides a high level of data and support models to its clients around the world. The model inputs include hours of play, weather conditions, and the expectation of field quality to dictate potential fertilizer needs and to supply the needed hours of lighting. SGL agronomists and engineers continue to evolve the growth and lighting models to best to supply clients with the correct lighting recipe to 1) use the light amount of light required and 2) meet the demands of field quality set by the client. A new addition to the models this year is disease modeling and alerting. The models will provide clients with on-demand data on potential diseases that their fields could be prone to. This data will greatly reduce the guessing that sometimes goes into spraying for disease suppression.
TECHNOLOGY: Technology is always evolving and improving. Especially with products involving energy and light. SGL is working closely with several companies to provide the latest in lighting innovation. These include the world leader in lighting, Phillips.

LED: LED is the most popular topic in the world in reference to lighting. Where LED is breaking into the stadium flood lighting market, for plant growth (and specifically grass growth) LED is still in development. The SGL research and development team is working closely with the green house development team at Porta Nova rose green houses to create the best system possible for LED and plant growth. The LED light spectrum can provide plants light. But heat is needed in combination with light to provide the most efficient growth. Currently the high pressure sodium lights provide that needed heat. Eliminating the high pressure sodium bulbs could reduce energy use, but then infrared heat is required to be added to provide the best growing conditions. The additional infrared heat actually increases overall energy costs.
In the end, it seems some sort of hybrid option with a mix of LED and high pressure sodium will be worked out. But as demands on natural grass increase, the need for light intensity and heat increases as well to encourage regeneration of the grass plants.  IMG_0598

IQ55: Back to the IQ55. The technology involved in the IQ55 controlled growing environment is a new level for anything ever seen in turfgrass growth. The automated sensor system inside the IQ55 allows a natural grass field manager to have complete control of the growing environment. Though somewhat small compared to a full size field, the IQ55 is large enough to treat and repair quickly high traffic areas such as the front of a baseball infield, between the hash marks on an American football field, or through the PK area on a soccer field. As the IQ series evolves, this will become a valued tool to win against high use.

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INNOVATION: To innovate is defined as to “make changes in something established, especially by introducing new methods, ideas, or products”. SGL was founded on innovation when it introduced the first supplemental turfgrass grow lighting solution into the market. No longer were shade or short day length limiting factors for natural grass growth. New solution, old problems.

Innovation is again a description with the UVC180 introduction. Turfgrass managers spend more time on disease pressure/ disease management than about any other turfgrass challenge. Many times budgets for fungicides match or even dwarf other budget categories. Thus, the potential that UV light could treat diseases to reduce the stress on turfgrass managers and/or reduce their budgets is ground shaking. No doubt there is much more to come in reference to UV light and diseases, but the initial introduction is extremely exciting!!!

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SGL MasterClass certainly was the thought provoking and educational event that participants had hoped for. Well done SGL, and CONGRATULATIONS on 10 years of such a unique and successful educational event.

FOR THE TIMELINE OF THE ENTIRE EVENT, VISIT HERE

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Always Improving! University of Portland’s Merlo Field Universe Fraze Mow #2 Results

This week University of Portland’s Merlo Field became the first cool season turfgrass field in the United States to employ Universe Fraze Mowing for a second time.  In April, 2014, Field Manager Jordon Montgomery also was the first, as the first ever USA Field Manager to turn to the process for cool season turfgrass to remove:

70% poa annua population
– 1″ layer of thatch
– Reduce a thick layer of organic matter accumulated on the top of the sand based soil

The 2015 results of the Universe Fraze Mowing process were superb.

Universe Fraze Mowing of Merlo Field, U of Portland

Universe Fraze Mowing of Merlo Field, U of Portland

Poa Annua Plants Removed From Strong Stand of #RPP Ryegrass and #HGT Kentucky bluegrass

Poa Annua Plants Removed From Strong Stand of #RPP Ryegrass and #HGT Kentucky bluegrass

Poa Annua Patch Removed

Poa Annua Patch Removed

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Poa Annua plants and seed have been removed, along with 2014’s thatch and organic build up to keep the field surface from becoming slick.  Now new ryegrass and Kentucky bluegrass seed will be sewed.  But even more importantly for durability and increased field use, the improved turfgrass varieties of RPR Ryegrass and HGT Kentucky bluegrass seeded last year following the Universe Fraze Mow can re-generate.  This will encourage the grasses to spread, ultimately increasing the tensile strength of the base surface to reduce divoting and wear.

2014 reduced the poa annua population from 70% to 20%.

2014 Merlo Field Before Universe Fraze Mowing w/ 70% Poa Annua

2014 Merlo Field Before Universe Fraze Mowing w/ 70% Poa Annua

2015 Poa Reduction and Surface Improvement

2015 Poa Reduction and Surface Improvement

The 1″ thatch layer was also removed along with the top of a thick organic layer.  The removal yielded a dramatically better playing surface.  The clean and re-generated surface is tight and strong, leading to nearly no divoting even when being used in the rain.  After 3 months of camps in Summer of 2014, a full men’s and women’s college schedule in the fall, and 13 spring matches, the field was nearly perfect when the 2015 Universe Fraze Mowing took place.

Thick, Dense Stand Even Through Goal Areas After 13 Spring Matches,  Full Men's and Women's Season in the Fall, and Summer Camps in June, July, and August

Thick, Dense Stand Monday, Even Through Goal Areas After 13 Spring Matches, Full Men’s and Women’s Season in the Fall, and Summer Camps in June, July, and August

When Merlo Field is/ was in such excellent condition and the poa annua had been dramatically reduced, why Universe Fraze Mowing in 2015?

Simple.  Improvement.

From Field Manager Jordon Montgomery… “We want to continue to improve the playing surface while increasing use. The introduction Portland Timbers 2, the USL pro team calling Merlo Field home is an example of that.  All our home teams and events need the best playing surface we can provide while being environmentally and budget conscious.  That all leads to Universe Fraze Mowing”.  

#GrassCanTakeMore.

AMAZING EVOLUTION & Quick History!  Universe fraze mowing cool season turfgrass was first performed at Paris St-Germain’s Parc des Princes Stadium in July of 2013.  New Head Groundsman Jonathan Calderwood chose the bold method, previously only used in the United States on bermudagrass, to remove the poa annua plants in his pitch and leave behind the existing desirable Kentucky bluegrass and Ryegrass.

PSG Renovation July 2013 (32)

So yes… Universe Fraze Mowing is DIFFERENT than basic fraise mowing.  Fraise mowing was introduced in 1996 by Mr. Ko Rodenburg, Superintendent of Parks Maintenance in Rotterdam, Holland when he invited the KORO Field Topmaker.  Rodenburg invented the machine to clean the poa annua seed off the top of his playing fields and to encourage some basic regeneration.  Fraise mowing was born!

With the introduction of the KORO Universe® Rotor for the Field Topmaker in winter of 2012-2013; allowing stolons and rhizomes on spreading grasses to remain while removing organic, thatch, and weed seed; lead to Universe Fraze Mowing directly from this blog to Mr. Allen Reed and Mr. Miles Studhalter’s bermuda fields at FC Dallas.  See for details: Summary of a new concept; Fraze Mowing & Concept to Active Practice; Fraze Mowing Debuts at FC Dallas.   The use on bermudagrass had started, then Mr. Calderwood working with Mr. Simon Gumbrill from Campey Turf Care, took the lessons from bermudagrass and implemented them to cool season. Now Jordon Montgomery in Portland as taken it even further with repeated use.  AMAZING how it continues to evolve with creative minded Field Managers ready and willing to try to new things!  #GrassCanTakeMore!

XtraGrass at Lakewood Memorial

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XTRAGRASS

In search of new ideas for natural grass surfaces, Growing Green Grass visited JeffCo Schools Lakewood Memorial Stadium last week in Denver, CO. The Lakewood Memorial field features a new version of synthetic reinforcement for natural grass called XtraGrass. The field is a RPR/ HGT seeded field, and has had 60 soccer matches played in 60 days.  The condition of the field was fantastic. Great work by Sports Field Manager Chris Gray and team at JeffCo Schools!  Thanks Chris for having us!

What is XtraGrass:
XtraGrass is essentially synthetic turf that is infilled with sand and grass instead of rubber, sand, cork, etc. Once XtraGrass is installed, the carpet “backing” begins to biodegrade and the natural grass roots through into the soil below.

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 How Does It Work?
The synthetic fibers coming up through the sand protect the crown of the grass plants. When a player stops, plants, turns, or pushes off, the synthetic fibers assist in footing and provide reinforcement to reduce shear and divots. Many of the 60 matches at Lakewood Memorial have been played in the rain, and absolutely no divots or tears were evident. Especially telling as the field was seeded only in late June and opened in late August. When the field begins to wear, the synthetic fibers provide continued stability and supply a green cast to the field. XtraGrass on its own without sand and grass infill achieves a FIFA 1-star rating.

Graff Turf on XtraGrass Installation 

Roots pushing through a piece we ripped up

Roots pushing through a piece we ripped up

How Is It Different?
The initial question that comes to mind is “how is XtraGrass different”? Different than SportGrass in the 90’s, different than the product distributed by Motz currently, different than even Desso’s GrassMaster. Those are all questions that have to be answered by the producers of each of those products. But certainly it seems that XtraGrass could be just as its advertised.. Different. The biodegradable backing on the field at Lakewood is showing signs of break down, and roots are starting to push through into the native soil below. And as mentioned, absolutely no divoting was present on the surface of the field

 Graff Turf on Grow-In 

Maintenance
Maintenance of an XtraGrass field is relatively similar to any other high traffic grass field. Lakewood Memorial is not a big budget field; rather Mr. Gray is on a small budget with challenges that most all field managers can relate to.

In regards to specific XtraGrass maintenance, regular aeration with solid tines/ deep tines to keep the field de-compacted is important. Core aeration is not possible because the backing will not go through the tines, but the top layer is sand and the grass is grown in from seed so there is no organic layer need to be opened up w/ core aeration. Dry-Ject, Air2G2, and such seem possible. As is slicing or spiking to promote rooting through the backing.

The main maintenance key in the long term will be thatch management. Thatch/ organic build up will have to be limited to keep the synthetic fibers in play. If the build up gets above the fibers, they will be useless. Regular, light verticutting and yearly to bi-yearly Universe® fraze mowing will be required. The Universe® rotor for the KORO Field Topmaker was originally invented to clean organic from Desso Grassmaster to avoid this very thing, so it is ideal for XtraGrass. Ultimately though, XtraGrass requires little special treatment than any other grass field

Synthetic fibers: smooth; RPR ryegrass: veins

Synthetic fibers: smooth; RPR ryegrass: veins

Conclusion
At initial introduction, XtraGrass seems to be exactly what it is advertised to be. A natural grass/ synthetic hybrid system is scary to many because of the failures of products in the past. But because those failures in the past are understood, it is possible for such a product to work in the present and future. The Lakewood Memorial field is a high traffic, low maintenance example of how XtraGrass could help high traffic fields, especially in cool season climates where stability is an issue. Sports field managers and users are in need of a bridge product between full synthetic and standard natural grass… XtraGrass very much could be that bridge.

We will continue to observe and update you… more to come!

See the XtraGrass website: http://www.xtragrass.com/en/

Share With Us. Natural Grass IS the Answer!

NBC News ran a story last Wednesday evening and Thursday morning that exposed fears on artificial turf to the general public. Here is the original story:    NBC Investigation

NBC News Artificial Turf Investigation w/ Gorgeous Grass Field at U of Portland's In The Background

NBC News Artificial Turf Investigation w/ Gorgeous Grass Field at U of Portland In Background

With this story and many of the follow up stories, the call is for better research on rubber crumb and organic infills for artificial turf fields.

But instead of waiting for more research for artificial, instead we can all lead the call for better quality NATURAL GRASS fields!!

Artificial turf came into being because of a problem: Grass fields weren’t being maintained or were not taking the heavy use. The general public now thinks that is just always the case: Grass fields just can’t take it heavy play or can’t be used in the rain.

Well now we know that is just not true!! This is the era of better maintenance tools and techniques.  Innovation and creativity is expanding.  YES, NATURAL GRASS FIELDS CAN TAKE MORE USE!! Always!! 

This weekend Turf Republic published a piece by Growing Green Grass founder Jerad Minnick wrote with that theme:  A recommitment to natural grass can meet the field needs!  Grass IS The Answer!  (Also find it below)

Growing Green Grass encourages YOU to take this opportunity to help re-establish positive public thinking towards natural grass fields. Right now around you there are parents, coaches, administrators and lawmakers talking about the concerns of artificial with no idea that natural grass IS the answer. Can you help let those people know the possibilities of grass?

How you ask? Just simply share the positive possibilities of natural grass with people not in the turfgrass/ sports field industry!  NATURAL GRASS FIELDS CAN TAKE MORE!

Some things to consider to get the word out to people:

– Share the NBC news story on your social media platforms and through email w/ neighbors, family, friends, school board members and AD’s. These people are not in the turfgrass industry and do not get regular information like you.  However, we recommend not to give commentary.   Just share the story.  Remember that there are people suffering. And there are good people on the other side of this that sell, distribute and market artificial.  Additionally, many of your are currently maintaining some artificial turf.  Let NBC tell the story, not you.

– Follow up the story from NBC to all of the same people and share the POSITIVE MESSAGE about the possibilities of grass!!!  NATURAL GRASS CAN TAKE MORE!

– In your sharing, pass your personal passion and support for the possibilities of grass!! Your passion makes it real for others.  They can connect with you and will appreciate your unique skills and experience as part of the natural grass industry.

So SPREAD THE WORD!  Remember…  STAY POSITIVE

Always feel free to use anything coming from Growing Green Grass (www.growinggreengrass.net) to support your passion.  Employ the hashtag #GrassCanTakeMore via social media. TPI and the Lawn Institute have excellent resources on the good of grass as well  Lawn Institute Website

THANK YOU for using this opportunity to share the possibilities of grass and shape the bright future of the natural grass sports field industry.

And THANK YOU for your time and consideration.

Sincerely,

The Team at Growing Green Grass


Grass IS the Answer!

by Jerad Minnick • 3 days ago
A commitment to the existing grass fields around us can meet the immediate needs for safe, quality playing fields.

TR_Grass

TURF REPUBLIC:  http://www.turfrepublic.com/2014/10/11/grass-answer/

The unknowns of synthetic turf safety have burst into the limelight this week. The call is for additional research on synthetic turf rubber crumb infills or a change to organic infills for new fields being installed.

But instead of waiting years for research, the answer already exists! A commitment to the existing grass fields around us can meet the immediate needs for safe, quality playing fields. Here is how that can work:

Less Cost:
With an existing field, as little as 1/10th of the amount of money needed for 1- synthetic field is needed to improve and maintain that grass field over 10 years. In a world of tight budgets, spending to improve and maintain 10 existing grass fields correctly instead of building 1 synthetic will make a significant difference.

Additionally, to build and maintain a quality grass field that is rainout proof, 1/3 to 1/2 of the monetary investment of a synthetic field is required over 10 years. See more basic expense figures here: Grass v synthetic, The numbers

Playability:
Natural grass fields can be built and maintained to meet playability needs based on level, demand, and budget. Grass can be maintained to fit the level of surface that is needed. Slow, fast, soft, firm, wet, dry. All factors can be controlled.

On maintained grass the ball always “rolls”, allowing players to predict ball movement. Skin burns and abrasions aren’t common with grass. That fact allows players to attack aggressively and naturally without fear of injury. And that same grass surface has a temperature below the outdoor temperature, naturally cooling the area for players. See more thoughts on playability: Artificial turf makes no sense for soccer

Environmental/ Health impact:
Natural grass is just that… natural. The environmental benefits of grass are many. And all-natural, natural grass that needs no EPA approved pesticides is near because of improved grass genetics, evolving maintenance practices, and new technology for pest control.

More positives from natural grass are:
– Filters pollutants from storm water as it soaks back into the soil
– Reduces noise pollution by up to 40%
– Cools the ambient air temperature
– Produces oxygen (1 field/ yr produces enough to supply up to 128 people)
– Reduces CO2 (1 field/ yr removes the equivalent emitted by a car driving 6,000 miles)
With acres of park and stadium fields around the world, the good of grass has a huge positive impact on players and society. See more details: Healthy lawn, healthy environment

Innovation for durability and player safety:
The tools used for grass fields improve daily. Creative thinking and technology offer a wide range of innovation for grass fields.

Grass breeding and genetics: Grasses, both warm & cool season, are now available that grow twice as fast and are double as durability as standard, accepted grasses.

Technology for plant feeding and health: Environmentally friendly fertilizers have been developed for healthy grass growth. These products are created in cooperation with government regulations to protect the environment. The friendly fertilizers help produce thick, strong grass that the EPA has endorsed as important for ground-water filtration.

Development of safety and durability tools: A wide range of safety and durability tools are available to be used on grass fields. Systems to absorb energy and reduce surface hardness and injury potential are available. Products that provide surface stability to eliminate slipping and divoting have been developed. No longer is it just grass and dirt. Innovation is advancing possibilities of grass fields.

Human Element:
Natural grass is economical, player friendly, good for the environment, and continues to improve with innovation. But ultimately the biggest advantage grass fields have is the human care they receive from dedicated turfgrass managers. Existing turfgrass managers, provided with a few tools, can produce a low-cost, environmentally friendly field. In an age of needed job creation, committing money to maintain grass fields instead of building synthetic will create numerous new environmentally friendly jobs in the sports & park industry.

There is an immediate need for safe, quality playing fields. The fields needed ALREADY EXIST! But “if you always do what you have always done, you will always get what you have always gotten”. It’s no longer acceptable to spend little to no money to maintain an existing grass field but then turn to a million dollar synthetic field. Yes, a simple commitment to improvement and maintenance of natural grass fields can provide the answer!